Homeland Security Watch

News and analysis of critical issues in homeland security

April 18, 2009

Please join the conversation

Filed under: General Homeland Security — by Philip J. Palin on April 18, 2009

spring-shoots-long1

Since Tuesday, April 14 the number of readers for Homeland Security Watch has nearly doubled.  There is evidence many first-time readers are coming back.  Our pageviews have surged. Looks like we are being checked out.

Welcome.  We hope you find good cause to keep coming back and we look forward to your questions, commentary, and — in particular — cultivating a conversation.

Most new readers come from beyond-the-beltway.   For most of the blog’s history, inside-the-beltway readers have been the majority.  If the new readers continue, this balance will shift.

Homeland Security Watch is a third-generation blog.  By that I mean the current contributors are the third in a succession of principal contributors since December 2005.  Our founder, Christian Beckner, set out the purpose as:

Homeland Security Watch is a blog that features breaking news, rigorous analysis, and informed commentary on the critical issues in homeland security today. It takes a cross-disciplinary approach to the subject of homeland security, spanning issues such as transportation security, preparedness and response, infrastructure protection, and border security. Its content is intended both for an expert-level policy audience as well as the broader general audience of people interested in homeland security. The blog is non-partisan and non-commercial.

Each of us — contributors and readers — bring predispositions to the blog.   I try to be transparent regarding these biases precisely to assist readers to filter for my bias.  But the blog is not flogging a particular point of view — and discourages flogging in all its forms.

Each originating contributor is responsible for allowing or editing comments to their posts. I have manually removed two comments, both spam related.  I do not — yet — have an explicit policy in terms of what I might censor.   But I am no fan of gratuitous vulgarity, personal attacks, or name-calling.

I appreciate — and am occasionally in awe of  — the thoughtful, detailed, and generous comments by readers.  Many blogs are wastelands suffocated in visceral excrement.  Homeland Security Watch is akin to a late April garden, a thousand tiny shoots breaking ground, promising  bounty ahead.  A few early blossoms dazzle.

The best blogs, in my opinion, are dialogical.  They are characterized by an ongoing conversation.  We do not — yet — do enough of this.  A small example emerged this last week, please see the discussion here.  But we can do better listening and responding to one another.  Again, welcome.  Please join the discussion.

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2 Comments »

Comment by William R. Cumming

April 18, 2009 @ 4:15 pm

As always looking to even more future generations!
Again my interest in this blog is rather simple. If the oldest and richest democracy (Republic) in the world can’t figure out Homeland Security no one elxe is likely to and will end up with military dominance of what should be a civil government function. IMO of course.

Comment by Christopher Tingus

April 19, 2009 @ 6:12 am

Thank you for letting us know of the ever increasing readership of Homeland Security Watch enthusiastically reading every word of the worthy and very enlightening and informative detailed posts.

Homeland Security Watch brings current and future concerns to the forefront and affords – anyone – whether within DHS HQ and other government agencies for instance or those as mere concerned citizens like myself to keep abreast of the issues as well as share individual perspective in our portrayal of the Love we have of this great nation and its most charitable and good people as well as our friends and neighbors both in Asia, in Europe and throughout.

We as a nation continue to be the beacon of hope for thousands who line up daily at sunrise at consulates and embassies worldwide seeking legal entry via approved visa.

We as a nation and people are truly concerned for the well being of others in a global stage riddled with political and economic challenges now seemingly threatening the fabric of civilized society. We have much to fear as dark clouds besiege the quality of Life for so many already in desperate plea for help.

People are enraged at the lack of compassion and real leadership values and solutions entrusted to the good ‘ol boys of the beltway as well as to those in government everywhere who have chosen to serve self-agenda versus the majority interests of the public.

This is our watch. We must continue to pledge our diligent commitment in devotion and safeguard the covenants we have been Blessed by the Lord as witnessed by so many who have chosen to leave the oppression of their homelands and come ashore to find hope and a more peaceful harmony with Life and others who share the same values of enhancing a civilized humanity.

As a good people like others in neighboring lands seeking to mentor and nurture generations to come, we must be clasp hands in embrace of these shared values, not necessarily embracing one another, however finding the thresholds of our similarities and making every effort to respect and understand another’s viewpoints. We must learn from one another.

Homeland Security Watch allows us much insight.

We are quite fortunate to have access to the internet for so many do not and a blog which helps us to understand policy making and he decision-making which assure our safety.

Let no one believe that America is unware to the evil and devious strategies being employed by those seeking to enjoin even more supporters in their objectives to seek our demise at any cost….

Never before have we been so threatened by those sophisticated in 21st century technology which demands that we stand tall in our commitment to cybersecurity always struving to maintain our tevhnological edge and never allowing others to surpass our competencies.

Kudos to the devoted Americans at NSA and other agencies within our government of the people and for the people, individuals who keep a watchful eye on those conspiring to commit wrongful acts. Yes, as a nation we are sometimes wrong in our policy decisions, yes we are not perfect and may often cause unintentional and devistating loss to others and for this as a people we are compassionate and truly sorry demanding accountability by both sides of the aisle who today seem to be so out of touch with reality.

The tea bag mentality at present is good for it has made those in leadership aware of people’s concerns and for example the outpouring of individuals willing to stand for the right to bear arms for all lawful purpose and the passion of those who believe in our constitutional rights. We see a rather despondent government and the many disheartening decisions depicted by signatories showing lack of clarity and out of touch with Main Street USA and taxation without representation can no longer be tolerated.

My (our) suggestion to the bureaucrats, go yourself to the convenience store if you even know such and and find out what a gallon of milk costs! Shock and awe will hopefully overwhelm you as well…

We cannot afford the taxes you are adopting state by state because of the failure to audit the books line by line and manage local, state and national governments. We do not want lotteries and casinos to take from our neighbors and families through such enticement, but rather we seek the support of government of entrepreneurial innovation, a revival of home based American manufacturing and customer service calls directed to Seattle and Dallas and Boston, not Mumbi.

We are very aware of the emerging revival of Germany’s manufacturing base and its large global distribution as Germany seeks to disuade others from support of America and its super power prominence.

We see the KGB Putin seeking well known ambitions. We are aware of the Chinese government using our “fiat dollars” being printed in the trillions to build a new modernized Naval prominence controlling sea lanes and managing global container ops. With the real possibility that China will buy $100 million in gold reserves as it has focused in recent years accumulating many valuable resources, the price of gold may spike to $2,000+ an ounce very quickly and the stability of the dollar will be in question all affecting Homeland Security.

As we saw the G-20 and in particular the Europeans turn their cheek to the new President, while kissing and hugging the first lady, we shall see a reinvigorated Germany with its 27th September national elections which will set the policy stage to cast the present 27 EU composition of hopefuls to only ten (10) nations making these other nations dependent on a German led EU which seeks dominance in the Middle East by its thirst for oil to support its re-emerging manufacturing base and harsh nationalistic ambitions supported by the Vatican and its powerful reach in a certain challenge to Iranian leadership provoking strife and even more uncertainty which we can do without.

The Israelis – the Hebrews – seeing a reported increase in global prejudice as history seems to be repeating itself as always worthy of the lessons it teaches us, must be particularly cautious of those seeking to help as they may be duped and East Jerusalem slipping further into dismal hope. The Palestinian people deserve more and the Arab league and the rich of Dubai have no obvious other than permit hopelessness and dsespair to pervade the hearts of these simple people looking to help their young.

I have walked the streets of Hebron and Jericho like many who are avid readers of Homeland Security Watch and these good and devout people deserve more from the Arab league and the oil rich nations of the region in contributing even more to infrastructure through fiscal commitment to building schools and educating the precious young offering them an education for the Palestinian children deserve more than being used as pawns.

Demographics show a rather young composition of populace in Arab speaking nations. I see the lack of commitment among the accomplished and very wealthy to help motivate not only Palestinian children, but youth from throughout the region to become more competitive with the Chinese for instance and of those studying and graduating in India with science and technological disciplines, not the law degress that American graduates espouse because of a lack of educators to understand what wondrous opportunities are within our grasp and the enhancements of Life that study and valued solutions bring to society at large….

Thus, the need for Homeland Security Watch and a resounding appeal to others with even keener and more experienced insight to help us all better understand ourselves, our challenges and protectionism and that of a world with six (6) billion+ human beings with many of the same needs and desires for hope and peaceful coexistence, yet with various mentalities and perspectives in aspirations.

When reading Homeland Security Watch, an array of information is shared related to governmental policy and global concerns, however we must all remember that the majority share many common civilized principles understanding that we must all adhere to basic premises if we are to enhance our knowledge of ourselves and neighbors and the vast universe(s) which are within our reach offering solutions to longevity and harmony in our respect for one another and peace among nations.

Thank you Homeland Security Watch!

As simply a reader of this blog, I ask that fellow readers share their perspectives by more responses to each and every informative posting provoking ensuing discussions where we can all learn from one another and concur with one another as well as disagree. you

Christopher Tingus
aka
Mr. & Mrs. Joe Citizen
Harwich (Cape Cod), MA USA

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