Homeland Security Watch

News and analysis of critical issues in homeland security

March 2, 2012

366 Homeland Security Words

Filed under: Intelligence and Info-Sharing — by Christopher Bellavita on March 2, 2012

The Electronic Privacy Information Center posted a copy of a document titled “Department of Homeland Security, National Operations Center, Media Monitoring Capablity, Desktop Reference  Binder” (or MMCDRB for short).

The headline of the EPIC story: EPIC Obtains New Documents on DHS Media Monitoring, Urges Congress to Suspend Program

The reaction to the “desktop reference binder”  included such monochromatic headlines as:

Words to get your website on a government watch list – Social media monitoring!

Homeland Security has its eye on your Metro tweets, D.C. riders

The Department of Homeland Security Is Spying On Your Social Media Updates

Why is the government monitoring social media networks?

The DHS surveillance of OccupyWallStreet (Ok, different, but related.)

DHS Monitoring Of Social Media Under Scrutiny By Lawmakers

The Department Of Homeland Security Is Searching Your Facebook And Twitter For These Words

There is a lot that can be written about this manual and the complex issues illustrated by almost every section of the 40 page document.  But that’s not what I want to write about. I want to write briefly about the search terms in the manual.

———————

One can always get a good 50 minute discussion going in a graduate seminar by asking “What is Homeland Security?”

The question can be addressed through a variety of inquiring systems (meaning ways of gathering and processing information about a question):

- Deductively –  by starting from general principles

- Dialectically — focusing on the conflicts  in homeland security

- Abductively — basically hunches and guesses

- Idealistically – Including ideas from as many perspectives as possible

- Pragmatically — an open systems, do-whatever-works approach

- or Detour and Access — beating around the bush, gaining access to homeland security by detouring around messy issues

No doubt there are other inquiring systems.  Let me mention one more.

One unintended, albeit minor, consequence of the MMCDRB is to assist with an inductive answer to the what is homeland security question.

———————

Induction is about generating abstractions by aggregating specific instances.  If deductive inquiry starts with principles and moves to data. Inductive inquiry starts with data and moves to principles, or at least propositions.

Without getting into the many (serious) problems of inductive inquiry, one can take the current list of “key words and search terms” in the MMCDRB, mix up the pieces — in this case alphabetically — and get a snapshot of how broad homeland security has become in the last decade.

Try it for yourself. There’s a story, a controversy, a fear, a mission or a budget in every word.

Key Words and Search Terms

1.         2600
2.         Abu Sayyaf
3.         Afghanistan
4.         Agent
5.         Agriculture
6.         Agro
7.         Agro Terror
8.         Aid
9.         Air Marshal
10.       Airplane (and derivatives)
11.       Airport
12.       Al Queda (all spellings)
13.       Al-Shabaab
14.       Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms (ATF)
15.       Ammonium nitrate
16.       AMTRAK
17.       Anthrax
18.       Antiviral
19.       AQAP (Al Qaeda Arabian Peninsula)
20.       AQIM (Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb)
21.       Arellano-Felix
22.       Artistics Assassins
23.       Assassination
24.       Attack
25.       Authorities
26.       Avalanche
27.       Avian
28.       Bacteria
29.       Barrio Azteca
30.       BART
31.       Basque Separatists
32.       Beltran-Leyva
33.       Biological
34.       Biological infection (or event)
35.       Biological weapon
36.       Black out
37.       Blister agent
38.       Blizzard
39.       Body scanner
40.       Bomb (squad or threat)
41.       Border
42.       Border Patrol
43.       Botnet
44.       Breach
45.       Bridge
46.       Brown out
47.       Brush fire
48.       Brute forcing
49.       Burn
50.       Burst
51.       Bust
52.       Cain and abel
53.       Calderon
54.       Canceled
55.       Car bomb
56.       Cartel
57.       Cartel de Golfo
58.       Center for Disease Control (CDC)
59.       Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)
60.       Chemical
61.       Chemical burn
62.       Chemical fire
63.       Chemical Spill
64.       Chemical weapon
65.       China
66.       CIKR (Critical Infrastructure & Key Resources)
67.       Ciudad Juarez
68.       Closure
69.       Cloud
70.       Coast Guard (USCG)
71.       Cocaine
72.       Collapse
73.       Colombia
74.       Communications infrastructure
75.       Computer infrastructure
76.       Conficker
77.       Consular
78.       Contamination
79.       Conventional weapon
80.       Cops
81.       Crash
82.       Crest
83.       Critical infrastructure
84.       Customs and Border Protection (CBP)
85.       Cyber attack
86.       Cyber Command
87.       Cyber security
88.       Cyber terror
89.       DDOS (dedicated denial of service)
90.       Deaths
91.       Decapitated
92.       Delays
93.       Denial of service
94.       Department of Homeland Security (DHS)
95.       Dirty bomb
96.       Disaster
97.       Disaster assistance
98.       Disaster management
99.       Disaster medical assistance team (DMAT)
100.    DNDO (Domestic Nuclear Detection Office)
101.    Dock
102.    Domestic nuclear detection
103.    Domestic security
104.    Drill
105.    Drug
106.    Drug Administration (FDA)
107.    Drug cartel
108.    Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA)
109.    Drug trade
110.    Drug war
111.    E. Coli
112.    Earthquake
113.    Ebola
114.    Eco terrorism
115.    El Paso
116.    Electric
117.    Emergency
118.    Emergency Broadcast System
119.    Emergency Landing
120.    Emergency management
121.    Emergency response
122.    Enriched
123.    Environmental terrorist
124.    Epidemic
125.    Erosion
126.    ETA (Euskadi ta Askatasuna)
127.    Evacuation
128.    Execution
129.    Exercise
130.    Explosion (explosive)
131.    Exposure
132.    Extreme weather
133.    Extremism
134.    Facility
135.    Failure or outage
136.    FARC (Armed Revolutionary Forces Colombia)
137.    Federal Air Marshal Service (FAMS)
138.    Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)
139.    Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)
140.    Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)
141.    First responder
142.    Flood
143.    Flu
144.    Food Poisoning
145.    Foot and Mouth (FMD)
146.    Forest fire
147.    Fort Hancock
148.    Fundamentalism
149.    Fusion Center
150.    Gang
151.    Gangs
152.    Gas
153.    Grid
154.    Gulf Cartel
155.    Gunfight
156.    Guzman
157.    H1N1
158.    H5N1
159.    Hacker
160.    Hail
161.    Hamas
162.    Hazardous
163.    Hazardous material incident
164.    Hazmat
165.    Help
166.    Heroin
167.    Hezbollah
168.    Home grown
169.    Homeland Defense
170.    Homeland security
171.    Hostage
172.    Human to ANIMAL
173.    Human to human
174.    Hurricane
175.    Ice
176.    IED (Improvised Explosive Device)
177.    Illegal immigrants
178.    Immigration Customs Enforcement (ICE)
179.    Improvised explosive device
180.    Incident
181.    Industrial spill
182.    Infection
183.    Influenza
184.    Infrastructure security
185.    Interstate
186.    IRA (Irish Republican Army)
187.    Iran
188.    Iraq
189.    Islamist
190.    Jihad
191.    Juarez
192.    Keylogger
193.    Kidnap
194.    La Familia
195.    Law enforcement
196.    Leak
197.    Lightening
198.    Listeria
199.    Lockdown
200.    Looting
201.    Los Zetas
202.    Magnitude
203.    Malware
204.    Mara salvatrucha
205.    Marijuana
206.    Maritime domain awareness (MDA)
207.    MARTA
208.    Matamoros
209.    Meth Lab
210.    Methamphetamine
211.    Metro
212.    Mexican army
213.    Mexicles
214.    Mexico
215.    Michoacana
216.    Militia
217.    Mitigation
218.    MS13 or MS-13
219.    Mud slide or Mudslide
220.    Mutation
221.    Mysql injection
222.    Narco banners (Spanish equivalents)
223.    Narcos
224.    Narcotics
225.    National Guard
226.    National infrastructure
227.    National laboratory
228.    National Operations Center (NOC)
229.    National preparedness
230.    National preparedness initiative
231.    National security
232.    Nationalist
233.    NBIC (National Biosurveillance Integration Center)
234.    Nerve agent
235.    New Federation
236.    Nigeria
237.    Nogales
238.    North Korea
239.    Norvo Virus
240.    Nuclear
241.    Nuclear facility
242.    Nuclear threat
243.    Nuevo Leon
244.    Organized crime
245.    Outbreak
246.    Pakistan
247.    Pandemic
248.    Phishing
249.    Phreaking
250.    Pipe bomb
251.    Pirates
252.    Plague
253.    PLF (Palestine Liberation Front)
254.    PLO (Palestine Libration Organization)
255.    Plot
256.    Plume
257.    Police
258.    Pork
259.    Port
260.    Port Authority
261.    Powder (white)
262.    Power
263.    Power lines
264.    Power outage
265.    Prevention
266.    Public Health
267.    Quarantine
268.    Radiation
269.    Radicals
270.    Radioactive
271.    Recall
272.    Recovery
273.    Recruitment
274.    Red Cross
275.    Relief
276.    Resistant
277.    Response
278.    Reynose
279.    Reyosa
280.    Ricin
281.    Riot
282.    Rootkit
283.    Salmonella
284.    San Diego
285.    Sarin
286.    Scammers
287.    Screening
288.    Secret Service (USSS)
289.    Secure Border Initiative (SBI)
290.    Security
291.    Service disruption
292.    Shelter-in-place
293.    Shootout
294.    Shots fired
295.    Sick
296.    Sinaloa
297.    Sleet
298.    Small Pox
299.    Smart
300.    Smuggling (smugglers)
301.    Snow
302.    Social media
303.    Somalia
304.    Sonora
305.    Southwest
306.    Spammer
307.    Spillover
308.    Standoff
309.    State of emergency
310.    Storm
311.    Strain
312.    Stranded/Stuck
313.    Subway
314.    Suicide attack
315.    Suicide bomber
316.    Suspicious package/device
317.    Suspicious substance
318.    SWAT
319.    Swine
320.    Symptoms
321.    Taliban
322.    Tamaulipas
323.    Tamiflu
324.    Tamil Tiger
325.    Target
326.    Task Force
327.    Telecommunications
328.    Temblor
329.    Terror
330.    Terrorism
331.    Threat
332.    Tijuana
333.    Tornado
334.    Torreon
335.    Toxic
336.    Trafficking
337.    Transportation security
338.    Transportation Security Administration (TSA)
339.    Tremor
340.    Trojan
341.    Tsunami
342.    Tsunami Warning Center
343.    TTP (Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan)
344.    Tuberculosis (TB)
345.    Tucson
346.    Twister
347.    Typhoon
348.    U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (CIS)
349.    U.S. Consulate
350.    United Nations (UN)
351.    Vaccine
352.    Violence
353.    Viral Hemorrhagic Fever
354.    Virus
355.    Warning
356.    Watch
357.    Water/air borne
358.    Wave
359.    Weapons cache
360.    Weapons grade
361.    Wildfire
362.    WMATA
363.    World Health Organization (WHO and components)
364.    Worm
365.    Yemen
366.    Yuma

The list is not final.  The manual notes, “As natural and manmade disasters occur, new search terms may be added.”

 

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5 Comments »

Comment by Dan O'Connor

March 2, 2012 @ 11:28 am

SO;

Since you’ve listed all of them I will surmise that you, every reader, and every participant is now having their hard drives scanned through.

There is a 135 when 169 and 170 can be aggragated with 1-366. If we are not careful we will be held 171 and our 290 will always be tenuous.

This will generate peculiar findings and curious outcomes. Just an opinion

Comment by bellavita

March 2, 2012 @ 6:30 pm

Dan — your comment (and possible invention of a new form of DHS speak) reminded my of a very old joke:

This guy goes to prison and is assigned a cell. He hears someone in another cell yell “25″ and several people laugh. A minute later, someone shouts “92″ and there is more laughter. A few minutes go by. Someone hollers “17″ and the entire cellblock erupts in uncontrollable laughter.

The new prisoner says “WTF?” and asks his cellmate what’s going on.

His cellmate says since there is nothing much to do in prison, everyone just sits around all day telling jokes.

The new prisoner says “What are all the numbers about?”

His cellmate says, “Everyone already knows all the jokes by heart, so we give them all numbers so it doesn’t take so long to tell them.”

The new prisoner thinks about it for a while and decides that’s a pretty good idea, so he hollers out “54″.

Complete silence.

He looks over at his cellmate and says “What’s with all the silence?”

His cellmate shrugs his shoulders and says “Well, I guess some people can tell a joke and some can’t.”

I’ll take your comment as a 355.

Comment by William R. Cumming

March 3, 2012 @ 5:55 am

Assume the lawyers at DHS have documented to management that with the publication of the list and monitoring of Social Media they have constructive legal notice of all deficiencies in management and administration of DHS programs, functions, and activities of DHS and thus have lost plausible deniability to any oversight orgs?

WE NEVER HEARD THAT?

WE NEVER SAW THAT?

NO ONE TOLD US?

NEWS TO US?

In other words as the only real federal organization to have a statutory role in domestic intel [other like the FBI don't hold up to scrutiney IMO] they have constructive notice of all domestic intel gathered.

Comment by William R. Cumming

March 4, 2012 @ 1:40 am

Missed “seductively” as an analytic framework for HOMELAND SECURITY! Slipping into the vortex or whirlpool of fear as a driver but only if the probabilities are low but consequences high.

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March 5, 2012 @ 3:31 pm

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