Homeland Security Watch

News and analysis of critical issues in homeland security

October 24, 2014

The Homegrown Jihadist Threat Grows

Filed under: Radicalization — by Philip J. Palin on October 24, 2014

In today’s — October 24 — Wall Street Journal, former Senator Joseph Lieberman and former senior Senate staffer, Christian Beckner (this blog’s founder) share the byline in the top-of-the-page op-ed. ┬áThey focus particular attention — as each has for many years — on the role of online radicalization.

Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • Reddit
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • Print
  • LinkedIn

5 Comments »

Comment by William R. Cumming

October 24, 2014 @ 9:09 am

Thanks Claire and Phil!

Comment by Michael Brady

October 25, 2014 @ 10:12 am

Did I miss the part where Mssrs. Lieberman and Beckner offered suggestions for what do to counteract online radicalization instead of simply complaining that the current administration hasn’t figured out what do about it either?

Comment by Christopher Tingus

October 26, 2014 @ 9:02 am

Breaking News: …and by the way, this WH administration seeks to continue negotiations with these thugs in Tehran…Really? When are the Persian women and their families going to rally against such extremism and sexism….

(CNN) — An Iranian woman convicted of murder — in a killing that human rights groups called self-defense against a rapist — was hanged Saturday, state news agency IRNA reported.

Reyhaneh Jabbari, 26, was sentenced to death for the 2007 killing of Morteza Abdolali Sarbandi, a former employee of Iran’s Ministry of Intelligence and Security.

The United Nations has said she never received a fair trial. The U.S. State Department also said there were concerns about the trial.

“There were serious concerns with the fairness of the trial and the circumstances surrounding this case, including reports of confessions made under severe duress,” State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said Saturday.

“We condemn this morning’s execution in Iran of Reyhaneh Jabbari, an Iranian woman convicted of killing a man she said she stabbed in self-defense during a sexual assault,” Psaki said.

The United Nations and the United States had expressed concerns over the fairness of Reyhaneh Jabbari\’s trial.\n\n

The United Nations and the United States had expressed concerns over the fairness of Reyhaneh Jabbari’s trial.
Jabbari’s execution was originally scheduled for September 30, but was postponed. Amnesty International said the delay may have been in response to the public outcry against the execution.
Jabbari was convicted of murder after “a flawed investigation and unfair trial,” according to Amnesty International.

The United Nations has said Sarbandi hired Jabbari — then a 19-year-old interior designer — to work on his office. She stabbed him after he sexually assaulted her, it said.
Jabbari was held in solitary confinement without access to her lawyer and family for two months, Amnesty International said in a statement. She was tortured during that time, the group said.

“Amnesty International understands that, at the outset of the investigation, Reyhaneh Jabbari admitted to stabbing the man once in the back, but claimed she had done so after he had tried to sexually abuse her,” the rights group said. “She also maintained that a third person in the house had been involved in the killing. These claims, if proven, could exonerate her but are believed never to have been properly investigated, raising many questions about the circumstances of the killing.”

Iranian Oscar-winning director Asghar Farhadi joined scores of Iranian artists and musicians calling for a halt to the execution. In an open letter, Farhadi asked the victim’s family to pardon her, a possibility under Iranian law.
Rights groups have criticized Iran for a surge in executions under Hassan Rouhani in his first year as president.

UK Foreign Office Minister for the Middle East Tobias Ellwood said he was “very concerned and saddened” that Jabbari had been executed, especially given the questions concerning due process in the case.

“The UN Special Rapporteur for Human Rights in Iran, Dr Ahmed Shaheed, noted that her conviction was allegedly based on confessions made while under threat, and the court failed to take into account all evidence into its judgment,” he said in a statement.

“Actions like these do not help Iran build confidence or trust with the international community. I urge Iran to put a moratorium on all executions.”
According to the United Nations, Iran has executed at least 170 people this year. Last year, it executed more people than any other country with the exception of China, the world’s most populous nation.
U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, speaking in July, said the death penalty has no place in the 21st century and urged all countries to work toward its abolition.

Trackback by Recommended Webpage

July 17, 2015 @ 5:56 am

Recommended Webpage…

Homeland Security Watch ┬╗ The Homegrown Jihadist Threat Grows…

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a comment

XHTML: You can use these tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>